EAMENA at ICHAJ 13

The International Conference for the History and Archaeology of Jordan (ICHAJ) occurs once every three years. It brings together the numerous teams working in Jordan in a forum to present their research, but also to discuss the challenges arising in the field. The theme of this year’s conference was ‘Ethics in Archaeology’.

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EAMENA at international round table on Yemen

We took part in a UNESCO-sponsored international round table held in the UNITAR offices in Geneva on 11 December 2015.

The scope of the round table, which included 15 participants (plus Justine Mackinnon of the Qatar Computing Research Institute via Skype conference call), was to discuss strategies for the integration of current crowdsourcing and mapping projects to aid Yemeni authorities in their efforts to monitor and assess damage to the country’s endangered cultural heritage.

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My week in EAMENA

This week EAMENA’s Andrea Zerbini is co-organiser (with the Department of Antiquities and others) of a conference at the Museum of Jordan in Amman – Protecting the Past. Archaeology , Conservation and Tourism in the North of Jordan. Its purpose is to highlight and promote discussion of threats to cultural heritage sites, as well as to develop strategies aimed at their preservation.

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Yemen

I want to consider the two extremes of endangered archaeology. On the one hand, we have the headline-grabbing destruction of part of a World Heritage Site, whilst on the other there is natural erosion and people going about their everyday lives, oblivious to what lies right under their feet (or, in this case tyres).

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Survey Gazetteer Digitisation

One of the principal aims of EAMENA is the survey of archaeological sites for threat or disturbance through the use of satellite imagery and aerial photographs. The compilation of what archaeology or heritage is there to begin with, before we can access how it has been impacted over time, is a many-faceted process. One of my tasks at the moment is scanning for potential sites in Yemen using satellite imagery available through Google Earth. This process is complemented by knowledge of previous archaeological surveys in the region.

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